Gaithersburg: 301-670-7030
Baltimore: 410-769-5400
Frederick: 301-668-2100
Contact Us For Legal Help

Workers' Compensation Blog

Why is it taking so long for my medical bills to be paid?

Wednesday, October 10, 2018


HCFA Forms

Maryland Workers’ Compensation laws require that medical bills be submitted on HCFA forms. These are standard billing forms used by most insurance companies that have fields for the appropriate and necessary CPT (current procedures terminology) codes. However, some practitioners may not be aware that this is a requirement for workers’ compensation claims or that the bill may be denied if it is not submitted properly on the HCFA form. The adherence to this rule varies between insurance companies, however if your provider is having trouble getting bills paid then the first step should be to ensure that the bills are submitted on HCFA forms. As an easy reference the workers’ compensation website provides a blank downloadable HCFA form.

Itemized Billing

Another reason your workers’ compensation medical bills are not getting paid could be that the bill that was sent to the insurance company was not itemized with the proper CPT codes. The workers’ compensation carrier cannot pay bills that are not properly itemized with these specific codes, similar to the codes that a primary care physician would provide to a private insurance company. In addition, many carriers also require that each office visit note from the billed dates of service are provided with the bill. This requirement is to ensure that the visit was related to a compensable body part or condition. Where the system fails is when the carrier denies payment of the medical bills and does not site to the reason it is denied. Often it is a clear case of one department not providing the proper medical records to the carrier’s billing department. Instead of working together the billing department denies the payment of the bill. To resolve this confusion and to save time our firm often will attach the appropriate medical report when sending in any reimbursement or bill pay request even though the carrier may have previously received the report.

Collections Letters

When a medical bill has not been paid, for various reasons, the provider will often send the bill to a collections agency or will seek payment from the claimant. It is important to know that a provider has their own course of action within the workers’ compensation commission to collect on bills for approved medical treatment. This is done through submitting a C51 claim for medical services to the commission. The commission will then issue an order nisi to the carrier requiring payment of the bills. The provider can request penalties, fees and interest if the bill is unpaid for over 45 days and the carrier failed to provide written communication of the denial. In addition, a claimant may notify the collections agency or doctor’s office that under Sec. 9-660, Labor and Employment Article, Md. Ann. Code, medical expenses related to an accepted and related workers’ compensation claim should be directed to the workers’ compensation insurance carrier.

Contact your Attorney

Facilitating payment of medical bills is one of the services we provide to our current and past clients for workers’ compensation cases we have handled. If you have not filed a claim for medical services that you feel are related to a workers’ compensation claim please contact our office as soon as possible so that we may assist you before these bills effect your credit.

 

The “Going and Coming Rule” in the District of Columbia

Thursday, September 13, 2018

What tends to surprise a lot of our clients is the fact that, in the District of Columbia, injuries sustained by employees while traveling to work or traveling home from work, are not covered by the District of Columbia workers’ compensation statute. The DC workers’ comp statute is codified in Title 32 of the DC Code. In order for an injury to fall within the statute, the injury must “arise out of” the injured worker’s employment.

An injury is said to ‘arise out of’ ones employment if the injury would not have occurred ‘but for’ the fact that an obligation of the employment duties puts the injured worker in a position where he gets injured. An injury is therefore, said to ‘arise out of’ ones employment when it occurs in the course of the employment on account of conditions of the employment which are the immediate cause of the injury.

Therefore, while we must travel via some mode of transportation in order to be able to arrive at our place of employment, or to return home, the traveling itself is not a condition of the actual employment, and is not an obligation of the physical work we do; the traveling and the work are separate and apart from one another.

However, there are instances where an employee’s travel to and from work can be considered to be a part of the employee’s actual work and an obligation of the employee’s employment.When this occurs, injuries sustained by the employee while traveling to and from work would be an exception to the ‘going and coming rule.’ Some factors that the court will consider are the following:

  1. Was the employee paid for his time to travel to and from work?
  2. Was the employee driving a company vehicle to and from work that he parks in his “home garage?” 
  3. Is the employee paid gas money to get to and from work? 

While there is no bright-line rule, the court will consider one or more of the above factors to see if there exists an exception to the “going and coming rule,” allowing the injury sustained while traveling to or from work to fall within the DC workers’ compensation statute.If any additional information is needed, I can be reached by email: lpisano@bsgfdlaw.com, or on my direct work number of: 301-740-3304.

Advice for the Apprehensive Injured Worker

Wednesday, September 05, 2018

A few times a week I get a call from an injured worker who is considering filing a workers’ compensation claim but is concerned about the repercussions that may take place after filing.

While it is understandable, and in certain circumstances a very real concern that an employer may retaliate against an injured worker after a claim is filed, if you are injured on the job it is important to understand what rights you may be giving up if you let your concerns influence you to not file a workers’ compensation claim. You may be giving up more by deciding not to file a claim than you would even in the worst case scenario for employer retaliation: termination. (Maryland is an “at-will” employment state, meaning an employer can fire an employee for any non-illegal reason. However it is against Maryland law to fire an employee for filing a workers’ compensation claim).

By failing to file a claim you may be giving up compensation at 2/3s of your pre-taxed wages for the period of time you are unable to work while you recover from your work injury. For municipal workers, this benefit can often be paid at 100% of your wages. Often times this means exhausting your hard earned personal, vacation and/or sick leave when your employer or its insurer is the legally responsible for paying your wages for each day missed. This benefit becomes especially important if you are separated from your employment. Whether you are separated from employment or not, you are still entitled to compensation if you cannot do your job and your doctor agrees that you must be out of work.

Perhaps most importantly, Maryland law requires the Employer/Insurer to pay for all of medical treatment necessitated by your work injury. Maryland is unique in that you have the right to seek treatment with a doctor of your choice. And most important of all, there is no time limitation on your ability to seek treatment as a result of a work injury. (The right to fight for treatment never expires once a claim has been timely filed and accepted, however, there are no guarantees your employer or their insurer will authorize the treatment you wish to have – a good reason to consult with a legal professional). If you fail to timely file a claim with the Workers’ Compensation Commission, often times the insurance adjuster will take longer to authorize treatment or refuse to authorize your care altogether as there is no real motivation to do so. By successfully filing a claim, you’re guaranteeing at least the right to fight for your employer to pay for your lifetime medical care.

Compensation for permanent disability is the last main benefit available to those who are successful in filing a workers’ compensation claim. Often times the money received for an individual’s permanent disability does not truly compensate him/her for the affect their injury has had on their life - especially with more serious injuries. However, some compensation is certainly better than receiving no compensation at all. By failing to file a claim, you forgo this right altogether. Some other important benefits to filing a claim are medical mileage reimbursement, vocational rehabilitation and temporary partial disability – to name a few.

You work hard at your job every day, giving up precious time with your family to help further your companies’ goals. If you get hurt while on the job you owe it to yourself to protect both you and your family by filing a claim. You should not have to pay out of your own pocket for medical treatment, struggle to make your bills because you are incapable of earning wages, or worse yet be forced to suffer from a life altering disability without receiving any assistance to get you back on your feet.

So if you get hurt on the job – protect yourself and your family by filing your claim. And if you’re concerned about the potential repercussions of doing so, consult with legal counsel to make sure you understand not just what problems may arise if you do file your claim, but what problems may arise if you don’t.

Call attorney Charles Schultz, Esq. today at (410) 769-5400.

 

The DC Workers’ Compensation Litigation Process

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Whenever I tell clients about the workers compensation litigation process in DC, they get a blank look on their face. What do you mean it takes two to three months to get a hearing date? What do you mean the insurance company can file an appeal if I win my case?

The unfortunate truth is that the litigation process in DC workers’ compensation cases can go on seemingly forever. This is one of the many reasons why it’s best to talk to an attorney from the onset. The time to hire an attorney is not when you are already in crisis mode and would have benefit from a hearing moths prior. Attorneys are able to do many beneficial things for their clients, but one thing they cannot do is speed up the DC litigation process, as that process is controlled solely and entirely by the DC Legislature and the courts.

In DC workers' compensation cases, the litigation process begins at an Informal Conference. This level is, more or less, a mediation where nothing is recorded, the parties are not under oath and the only witness is the injured worker. Either party is able to appeal from the written decision received following an Informal Conference. Those appeals go to a DC Formal Hearing in which an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) presides over the hearing. A formal hearing is much more complex than an informal conference. Each side to the case can present witnesses, the witnesses are under oath, the proceedings are recorded, and the rules of evidence apply. There is also almost always formal discovery conducted by both sides of the case. The discovery process can include written requests for information (such as interrogatories or request for production of documents) or verbal request (such as depositions of doctors or the injured worker).

It takes several months to receive a written decision from both the DC Formal Hearing Judge. But, the process does not stop there. After the Formal Hearing, either party can, yet again, file an appeal if they are not happy with the ALJ’s decision. This appeal is done by written legal Memoranda only, and does not involve an actual hearing. The legal memoranda are prepared by the attorneys and filed with the Compensation Review Board (CRB). If the CRB feels that there was an error of law, or that the ALJ’s decision was not based upon ‘substantial evidence,’ then the case will be sent back down to the ALJ for another Formal Hearing to get the case re-heard. If the CRB agrees with the ALJ, then the case will not be sent back down to the ALJ, and the ALJ’s decision will be final unless, of course, another appeal is filed.

If either party to the case is not happy with the decision of the CRB, the case can be appealed for a fourth and final time to the DC Court of Appeals. This time, legal Briefs are filed by the attorneys and argued before the Chief Judge and several other Court of Appeals Judges. The written decision of the DC Court of Appeals is truly final. The DC Court of Appeals can either affirm (agree with) the ALJ, or, the Court of Appeals can reverse (disagree with) the ALJ’s decision and send the case back down to the Formal Hearing level with instructions for the judge. If that occurs, the process can, more or less, start over again.

I hope that this blog shows you just how important it is to have an attorney representing you and your interests in your DC workers’ compensation case.The process can not only be lengthy, but can also be fairly complex. If you are looking for more details on the litigation process, please do not hesitate to reach me at lpisano@bsgfdaw.com or (301) 740-3304.

Where Do I File My Workers’ Compensation Claim – Maryland or D.C.?

Monday, July 09, 2018

It is sometimes very obvious where an injured workers should file his workers’ compensation claim following an on-the-job injury.For example, if the injured worker lives in the District of Columbia, and has always worked for his employer in the District, and gets injured in the District, then the claim for workers’ compensation benefits naturally should be filed in the District.

However, the situation becomes a bit more complicated when the injured worker does not get injured in the state where he normally works, or when the injured worker performs work for the employer in more than one state.In this blog, I will give a few different scenarios that tend to occur, in order to figure out where your workers’ compensation claim should be filed.

Scenario #1: The injured worker regularly works in Maryland, but happens to travel to the District of Columbia for work, and happens to be injured while performing that work for the employer in the District.

In the first scenario, under 32-1503 of the District of Columbia Workers’ Compensation Act, the District will not have jurisdiction over this claim.Having only “casual, occasional, or incidental” employment in the District is not enough.The workers’ compensation claim in that scenario should be filed in Maryland.

Scenario #2: The injured worker and the employer are both residents of Maryland, but the injured worker was assigned to do work for the employer in the District of Columbia for an extended period of time (weeks and months) and was injured in the District.

In the second scenario, the claim may be able to be filed in either Maryland OR in DC, with one caveat.The DC Worker’s Compensation Statute says that, if both the injured worker and the employer are not residents of the District, and the contract for hire was entered into in another State (like Maryland) then even though the injured worker had performed work for the Employer for an extended period of time in the District, and was injured in the District, the injured worker MAY be able to file a claim for workers’ compensation benefits in the District, but only if, the employer has workers’ compensation coverage in the District.So, in that second scenario, if the employer had insurance cover in the District, the claim for workers’ compensation benefits can be filed in EITHER Maryland or the District.If the employer does not have workers’ compensation coverage in the District, then the claim would have to be filed in the State of Maryland.

Scenario #3: The injured worker is hurt in the State of Maryland while performing work for a District of Columbia Employer and normally works in the District of Columbia.

Under 9-203 of Maryland Workers’ Compensation Statute, Maryland shares the same principal as the District such that “casual, occasional, or incidental” work in Maryland, when the employment is located and performed primarily in another jurisdiction (like DC), will not be enough to enable the injured employee to file a workers’ compensation claim in Maryland.

Scenario #4: The injured worker performs work for the employer in Maryland, DC and Virginia, but gets injured in DC, but both he and his employer are residents of Maryland.

This last scenario occurs often with transit drivers.In this scenario, the injured worker is not an incidental, casual or occasional employee of the District, but rather, has worked for the employer in the District on a regular basis for years.In this fourth scenario, because both the injured worker and the employer are both residents of Maryland (with, for example, the employee picking up his bus to begin his bus route at the Maryland headquarters) the injured worker would be able to file his workers’ compensation claim in both Maryland AND the District of Columbia, if and only if, the employee can prove that he is not an incident employee in the District.If the injured worker can testify that works as much or (better yet) more often in the District than he does in Maryland or Virginia, and again, is hurt in the District, then his claim for workers’ compensation benefits could be filed in the District.However, if the evidence shows that the employee works only a small percentage of the time in District, and works primarily in Maryland and Virginia, then the District of Columbia would not accept his workers’ compensation claim and the State of Maryland would be his only option.

If any additional information is needed, I can be reached by email:lpisano@bsgfdlaw.com, or on my direct office number: (301) 740-3304

 

Don't Forget The Mileage

Friday, June 15, 2018

The workers’ compensation process is not always a quick one, and in most cases, it is a slow and steady uphill battle.  Oftentimes, it can take several months after you sustain a work injury before any workers’ compensation benefits kick in.  For this reason, it is important to stay organized from the beginning and to know exactly what benefits are available to you that can help offset some of the financial strain you may experience as a result of your work injury. One important benefit that can easily slip through the cracks is mileage and transportation reimbursement.

If your workers’ compensation claim is found to be compensable by the Workers’ Compensation Commission, in addition to benefits for medical treatment and for time you may miss from work as a result of your injury, you are also entitled to reimbursement for the reasonable cost of your transportation to and from treatment appointments.In some special cases, your employer may even provide treatment-related transportation for you through a transportation service.

What type(s) of transportation benefits are covered?

Under Maryland Workers’ Compensation law, an employer is responsible for the cost of transportation to and from medical appointments if the appointments are a result of the claimant’s work injury. This includes transportation to doctor’s visits or other appointments, including appointments or evaluations scheduled by the employer.  Also, with the proper documentation, you are entitled to reimbursement for mileage, cab/Uber/Lyft fare, public transportation, parking, tolls, etc. (just to name a few).  The most common type of transportation benefit we see however, comes in the form of mileage reimbursement.

What type(s) of benefits are NOT covered?

The law does not allow transportation reimbursement for appointments besides those related to your work-injury, trips to the pharmacy, or reimbursement for any gas used to travel to your appointments (even if related to your injury).

How is mileage reimbursement calculated?

Each year, the Commission sets the mileage reimbursement rate which is used to calculate reimbursement payments per mile traveled.The most recent mileage reimbursement rates are as follows:

  • 2018 - .545
  • 2017 - .535
  • 2016 - .54

For a list of the yearly mileage reimbursement rate dating back to 1980, click here.

To calculate your total mileage reimbursement, multiply the mileage reimbursement rate for that year by the total number of miles traveled.For example, if your doctor’s office is five (5) miles from your home, and you had a doctor’s appointment on January 1, 2018, multiply the mileage reimbursement rate by the total number of miles traveled to and from the appointment:

  • [.545 x 10 = $5.45]

In summary, mileage reimbursement is an important benefit of filing a workers’ compensation claim and can provide some relief from the financial burden of a work-related injury. It is extremely important that you document your travel accurately and submit mileage forms and supporting documentation to your attorney regularly.  An easy way to keep track of your mileage is by using the Medical Travel Expense Form which can be found in the Document Center on our website.

If you have any questions related to mileage reimbursement or filing a workers’ compensation claim, do not hesitate to contact Kenrick Roberts today at (301) 670-6552 or kroberts@bsgfdlaw.com.

Report First – ‘Tough It Out’ Later

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

The first thing you must do when you get injured on the job is to notify your supervisor immediately. You do not have to notify your employer in writing, but it makes your claim much easier if you do. Whichever way you choose to notify, make sure you indicate the date and the time of the accident, and every body part that was injured.

Notice should be given even for minor injuries. You don’t have to miss work to report an injury. You can choose to tough it out and keep working after you get hurt but you should document it whether or not you can continue to work.  After reporting it to your supervisor, the next way to document your injury is to go see a doctor to get checked out. Whether you see your primary doctor or go to a clinic you want to make sure someone evaluates your injury so that if your condition gets worse down the road, you have already created a paper trail that will support you getting the treatment you may need later.

You Must Go Beyond Your Internal Claim Number

Once you report the injury, your employer may request that you fill out an incident report and even give you their own internal claim number. However, remember that reporting the injury does not mean that you have done everything to protect yourself. You still have to file a claim with the Maryland Workers’ Compensation Commission to fully make sure you are protected.

Although it’s ideal to notify your employer of a work-place injury as soon as it happens, Maryland law states that an injured worker has ten (10) days to report the injury. The law even provides some exceptions if you report beyond the ten (10) day requirement, but late reporting can give your employer a basis to contest or dispute your claim even though you might have a valid workers’ compensation claim. Therefore, you should report your injury as soon as it happens.

Follow These Steps If You Are Injured On The Job

So if you are injured on the job (even if it’s a minor injury and you do not miss time from work) remember these three easy steps:

  1. Report immediately (preferably in writing);
  2. See a doctor (even your primary care provider); and
  3. Contact the lawyers at Berman, Sobin, Gross, Feldman & Darby to file your claim!

Consequential Injuries May Be Covered Under Original Workers' Compensation Claim

Tuesday, February 06, 2018

Mr. M had a work related left leg injury.  He would go up and down the stairs using only his right leg.  He could only sleep on his right side.  He started using a cane on his right or “good” side to relieve the pressure and provide security against falls due to the imbalance his left leg injury had caused.  Then his left shoulder started causing him pain.  He had trouble buttoning his shirt and reaching for items in the kitchen cabinets.  Just my luck, he thought, now I have gone and done something to my shoulder.  After several months he was sitting with his lawyer discussing his workers’ compensation treatment for his left knee and he mentioned how it feels as if his body is falling apart.  After a few strategic questions from his lawyer and a visit with his doctor it was determined that the shoulder was related to his original workers’ compensation injury to his left leg.  The use of the cane caused additional pressure and strain on his shoulder.  Mr. M was able to have covered workers’ compensation treatment and an additional monetary award due to the shoulder strain.

When Will The Insurance Company Cover My Secondary Injury?

Similar to Mr. M many injured workers’ do not realize that if their secondary injury is causally related to the initial accident then that consequential injury may be compensable.  Consequential injuries are those injuries that occur directly as a result or consequence of an injury to a different body part.  For example, if a compensable knee buckles and causes a fall, which injures a wrist the wrist injury could then be deemed compensable.  It is important to document any of these consequential injuries whether at work or through a medical professional. Your attorney will work with you to gather the necessary medical documentation to prove that the injury is related to the original claim.  Then a hearing in front of the commission may be required to prove causal relationship between the secondary injury and the original injury.

Can I File For a Consequential Injury At Any Time?

Since there are statutes which impose limitations on when claims can be filed for additional injuries it is best to alert your attorney as soon as possible.  However, if the statute of limitations has run on earning additional compensation for the secondary injury it is still important to still talk to your doctor and your attorney about the injury.  Even if you are not entitled to additional money, you could be entitled to coverage for medical expenses and mileage related to your consequential injury.  It is always best to speak with your workers’ compensation attorney as soon as possible.  Many times in my practice clients only reveal the consequential injury after the statute of limitations has run or once it has become unduly burdensome, however if we handled your original claim I will handle your consequential injury even if no additional money can be earned.

The Year In Review At Berman, Sobin, Gross, Feldman & Darby LLP

Wednesday, January 03, 2018

2017 was an exciting year for our firm that included new additions to our staff, well-deserved recognition for a few of our attorneys, and a famous first pitch!

Let’s explore in greater detail some of the key moments from last year at Berman, Sobin, Gross, Feldman & Darby, LLP:

  Attorneys Ken Berman, Matt Darby, Michael Feldman, Craig Meyers, and Ari Laric were selected as Super Lawyers and Rising Stars in 2017 and again in 2018 along with the addition of Charles Schultz in 2018. 
One of our Founding Partners Ken Berman was one of the only attorneys recognized by the Washington Post be the Best Attorneys in the areas of workers’ compensation and motor vehicle negligence cases. 


Ari Laric testified in Annapolis, MD in support of injured workers who are part of the State Retirement System. 
 Charles Schultz spoke at the MWCEA Conference and was also a panelist. 

  Berman, Sobin, Gross, Feldman & Darby LLP expanded its staff with the hiring of Kenrick Roberts and Allyson Bloom
And who could forget…our very own Ken Berman throwing out the first pitch at a Frederick Keys baseball game in July. To our loyal Facebook contingent who voted on the outcome of the pitch…it was a strike  

Jury Verdict In Favor Of Montgomery County Bus Driver

Tuesday, December 19, 2017

School bus drivers spend hours transporting children to and from school in order to ensure that they arrive in a safe and timely manner. After years of performing this vital service for the community, the wear and tear on the bodies of bus drivers can have a profound impact on their ability to do their jobs. Natalie Whittingham, Ken Berman, and their team at Berman, Sobin, Gross, Feldman & Darby, LLC secured workers’ compensation benefits for a decades long school bus driver who developed chronic pain in her tailbone after years of bouncing up and down in an uncomfortable bus driver’s seat. The Maryland Workers’ Compensation Commission had found that the Claimant, who required three surgeries as a result of her tailbone pain, suffered an occupational disease arising out of and in the course of her employment for Montgomery County. The Employer, in an attempt to overturn this Order appealed to the Circuit Court. After an in depth three day long trial before a jury, which included expert testimony by two doctors, medical records, and the testimony of lay witnesses as to the hazards of the Claimant’s employment, the jury came back in favor of the claimant, upholding the Workers’ Compensation Commission. Ken and Natalie were able to defeat the County’s appeal and preserve the rights of the injured worker.

The Law of Occupational Disease

The most commonly known work related injuries, or “accidental injuries” occur when an employee is injured in an accident on the job at a particular time and on a particular day. Some examples of accidental injuries include slips, falls and car accidents. However, some work related injuries occur only after many years of the worker repeatedly performing their job duties. The onset may be slow in nature and results from the conditions of the employment. These are known as “occupational diseases”. Examples of an occupational disease could include carpal tunnel syndrome, in this case coccydynia (like the Claimant here suffered), lung cancer and hypertension. Injured workers who suffer occupational diseases may be covered, even where there is some other disorder or condition which contributes to the occupational disease. Here, the Claimant developed the occupational disease of coccydynia after many years of bouncing around in uncomfortable bus driver seats around the same time that she experienced rapid weight loss. The jury found that where the occupation of bus driving was even only a partial cause of the disorder, the claim was covered under the Workers’ Compensation Act.

What To Do If You Think You’ve Suffered An Occupational Disease

The law of occupational diseases is a complex area of the Workers’ Compensation Act and requires an attorney with experience to navigate its intricacies. In order to pursue a claim for disablement caused by an occupational disease, a medical opinion, relating your employment to your disorder is required and a claim must be filed within a certain amount of time of receiving that medical opinion. If you believe that you’ve suffered an occupational disease from repeated exposure to the physical or chemical hazards of your employment, it is imperative that you contact an attorney right away. If you are injured at work, contact Ken Berman, Esq. at (301) 740-3300 or Natalie E. Whittingham, Esq. at (301) 670-6546.

Recent Posts


Tags

Wrongful Death Claim Teachers Attorney Ken Berman Physical Training Injuries for Firefighters Auto Injury Incident Report Maryland Lawyer Attorney Julie Mirman Workers Compensation for Police Officers Injury Report Workers Compensation Benefits for Teachers Maryland Workers' Compensation Claim – Is My Injury Covered? Attorney Allyson Bloom Fire Fighters Attorney Charles Schultz Police Officers Maryland Workers Compensation Procedure Claims Process Medicare and Workers Compensation Occupational Diseases Work Related Injury Coming and Going rule Liabililty Laws and Regulations Workers Compensation win for 911 dispatcher Auto Accidents Attorney Alan Gross attorney Natalie Whittingham DC Workers' Compensation Permanent Disability Denial Attorney Nicole Lambdin Workers Compensation Fraud Injured School Bus Drivers Injured Courier Worker injured railroad workers FMLA Injured Fire Fighters Damages Attorney Ari Laric Attorney Matthew Engler Vocational Rehabilitation Benefits Medical Prescription Medication Side Effects Firefighters and Hearing Loss Personal Injury Benefits Accident Report Disability Insurance Mileage Reimbursement Temporary Total Disability Coming and Going rule, D.C. attorney Corrections Officers Maryland Workers Compensation Hearing Occupational Hazards Attorney Gretchen Rogers workers Compensation Act Vocational Rehabilitation Maryland Workers Compensation Commissioners Criteria Workers Compensation for Firefighters Firefighters Death Benefits Medical Travel Expense Maryland Workers Comp Attorney Matt Darby National Holidays MSEA Maryland Fire Fighters Independent Medical Evaluation Veterans Workers Compensation Claim Attorney Lauren Pisano Workers Compensation and Bankruptcy Railroad Injuries Unemployment Benefits auto accident attorney Transportation Reimbursement Workers’ Comp Attorney Attorney Cliff Sobin MSPRC

Archive

RSS

What Our Clients Say

Known for our unwavering commitment to clients, for our integrity, and for delivering the best results, our clients continue to refer their friends, families and neighbors to us for their legal needs.


"One year ago today I made the call to your office. The best decision I could make. I wanted to share with you how impressed I am with your staff and your professionalism."

Heather P.


"Craig did a great job representing me! He's the lawyer I have trusted with my legal needs because he's professional, knowledgeable, and keeps me informed about my case."

Jaclyn K.


"I would like to express my gratitude for your efforts and dedication for my disability case. It's has been quite a long and upsetting process but you have handled my case in an extremely competent and responsible manner."

Leo H.


"I have recommended Mr. Feldman to several of my friends and colleagues and have heard nothing but excellent reviews. He is the best lawyer I have ever used."

Martin


"I received the check today. I could not believe it until I saw the check. Thank you so much. You have improved my family's quality of life tenfold."

Mike F.


"These guys go above and beyond! They always have your best interest in mind."

Mike W.


"You have been kind throughout this process and I appreciate your professionalism as well as your gentle concern. Thanks for helping us and all the others who need your legal expertise. We are grateful."

Nancy F.


"Thanks to Mr. Shultz's aggressive and professional work ethic style I was able to receive the medical services and compensation pertaining to my case."

Navdeep C.


"I can honestly say this firm is simply TOP NOTCH! They not only have handled countless cases for my members that require their services, they also have gone well beyond their "scope" to help some of my folks in other areas of need. "

Rick H.


"The attention and professional care the staff has taken toward my needs has always been excellent. I have no complaints nor worries that my issues discussed are not addressed."

Tim T.


"I just got off the phone with Craig and let him know how thankful we are to you, him and Ken for all your efforts – you are all really terrific to work with!"

Val K.


Locations Throughout Maryland, Virginia & Washington DC

Gaithersburg Office

481 N. Frederick Avenue, Suite 300
Gaithersburg, MD 20877
301-670-7030 / 800-248-3352
Fax: 301-670-9492

Lutherville Office

1301 York Road, Suite 600
Lutherville, MD 21093
410-769-5400 / 800-248-3352
Fax: 410-769-9200

Frederick Office

30 W. Patrick Street, Suite 105
Frederick, MD 21701
301-668-2100 / 800-827-2667
Fax: 301-668-2000

Subscribe To Our Newsletter


TOP