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Repetitive Trauma Injuries

The terms repetitive trauma injury refers to a disorder that can affect bones, muscles, tendons, nerves and other anatomical features. It develops when micro traumas, or minute injuries, occur repeatedly from overuse or misappropriate use of a body part or external force applied to the body. A study in 1993 found that repetitive trauma injuries accounted for one of every four lost time injuries reported in the United States.

Injuries to the shoulders, arms, hands and wrists such as tendinitis, carpal tunnel syndrome and ulnar neuropathy can be caused by repetitive trauma. Risk factors for the development of these types of injuries include performing repetitive and forceful work in an awkward position and the use of vibrating tools. Railroaders who routinely use both pneumatic and non-power hand tools, move and carry heavy equipment and couple air hoses are at an increased risk of developing upper extremity repetitive trauma injuries.

Injuries in the form of osteoarthritis to the hips, knees, feet and ankles can also be caused by repetitive trauma. Risk factors for the development of these types of injuries include walking on uneven surfaces, repeatedly bending and stooping and working in awkward postures. Railroaders who routinely walk long distances across ballast, climb rail cars, squat to throw switches and couple air hoses and in the past, dismounted moving equipment, are at an increased risk of developing lower extremity repetitive trauma injuries.

By Matt Darby

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