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Maryland Workers' Compensation Attorneys > Blog > Railroad Injury > When Should An Injured Employee Give A Recorded Statement To The Railroad Claims Agent?

When Should An Injured Employee Give A Recorded Statement To The Railroad Claims Agent?

I am frequently asked the question of when an injured railroad employee should provide the Railroad’s Claims Agent with a recorded statement. The short answer is “when hell freezes over.”

The Real Purpose of a Recorded Statement

There is no advantage to an employee giving anyone from the Claims Department a recorded statement following an injury. The purpose of any recorded statement is merely to memorialize information that will be helpful to the Railroad in defending the case in court. Often, the Railroad’s Claims Agent will contact the employee and request a that a recorded statement be given following an injury. This is done under the guise of fact finding and information gathering. However, the real purpose of the recorded statement is to elicit information that can be used in court against the employee.

What You Say Can, and Will, Be Used Against You

I am blogging about this issue now because I have recently handled several cases in which recorded statements have severely hurt my clients’ cases. The Claims Agents are trained on the legal issues under the Federal Employers Liability Act (FELA). It is important to remember that in order to recover under the FELA, and employee must show that the Railroad was negligent or, stated differently, the Railroad failed to provide the injured employee with a reasonably safe place in which to work. At the time that a recorded statement is given, a full investigation obviously has not taken place. Information which may become available later will look fabricated if an employee denies facts that may become relevant later on after the case has been fully investigated. It is very damaging for a Jury to hear, in a railroad employees own words, information that contradicts what a subsequent investigation may reveal. The damage, in some cases, can be fatal.

The Claims Agent will also seek information that may help defend the case in other areas, such as information about prior injuries or pre-existing conditions which the Railroad may argue later are relevant to the issue of medical causation. In other words, the issue of whether or not the subject accident involving the injured employee was the cause of the damages alleged in a potential FELA claim.

So What IS an Injured Employee’s Obligation When Reporting an Injury?

The only obligation an injured railroad employee has is to complete the Railroad’s Injury Report. Those injury reports range from very detailed (ex. Those required by CSX Transportation), to very general (ex. Those required by Amtrak and others). The Injury Reports and the important sections thereof can be reviewed on my Legal App, which can be found by searching Matt Darby and Railroad in your smart phone’s App Store. Once that Injury Report is completed, the employee is under no obligation, legal or otherwise, to provide the Claims Department with a recorded statement (of any kind).

Why Sharing This Information Matters

Please help me get the word out by sharing this information with your fellow railroad workers. No one wants to be in the position of being injured on the Railroad. However, given the dangerous nature of the work, it is likely that at least some point during your career you may sustain an injury. This information could be the difference between a successful FELA Claim and one in which recovery may be limited.

By Matt Darby

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