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Advice for the Apprehensive Injured Worker

Advice for the Apprehensive Injured Worker

A few times a week I get a call from an injured worker who is considering filing a workers’ compensation claim but is concerned about the repercussions that may take place after filing.

While it is understandable, and in certain circumstances a very real concern that an employer may retaliate against an injured worker after a claim is filed, if you are injured on the job it is important to understand what rights you may be giving up if you let your concerns influence you to not file a workers’ compensation claim. You may be giving up more by deciding not to file a claim than you would even in the worst case scenario for employer retaliation: termination. (Maryland is an “at-will” employment state, meaning an employer can fire an employee for any non-illegal reason. However it is against Maryland law to fire an employee for filing a workers’ compensation claim).

By failing to file a claim you may be giving up compensation at 2/3s of your pre-taxed wages for the period of time you are unable to work while you recover from your work injury. For municipal workers, this benefit can often be paid at 100% of your wages. Often times this means exhausting your hard earned personal, vacation and/or sick leave when your employer or its insurer is the legally responsible for paying your wages for each day missed. This benefit becomes especially important if you are separated from your employment. Whether you are separated from employment or not, you are still entitled to compensation if you cannot do your job and your doctor agrees that you must be out of work.

Perhaps most importantly, Maryland law requires the Employer/Insurer to pay for all of medical treatment necessitated by your work injury. Maryland is unique in that you have the right to seek treatment with a doctor of your choice. And most important of all, there is no time limitation on your ability to seek treatment as a result of a work injury. (The right to fight for treatment never expires once a claim has been timely filed and accepted, however, there are no guarantees your employer or their insurer will authorize the treatment you wish to have – a good reason to consult with a legal professional). If you fail to timely file a claim with the Workers’ Compensation Commission, often times the insurance adjuster will take longer to authorize treatment or refuse to authorize your care altogether as there is no real motivation to do so. By successfully filing a claim, you’re guaranteeing at least the right to fight for your employer to pay for your lifetime medical care.

Compensation for permanent disability is the last main benefit available to those who are successful in filing a workers’ compensation claim. Often times the money received for an individual’s permanent disability does not truly compensate him/her for the affect their injury has had on their life – especially with more serious injuries. However, some compensation is certainly better than receiving no compensation at all. By failing to file a claim, you forgo this right altogether. Some other important benefits to filing a claim are medical mileage reimbursement, vocational rehabilitation and temporary partial disability – to name a few.

You work hard at your job every day, giving up precious time with your family to help further your companies’ goals. If you get hurt while on the job you owe it to yourself to protect both you and your family by filing a claim. You should not have to pay out of your own pocket for medical treatment, struggle to make your bills because you are incapable of earning wages, or worse yet be forced to suffer from a life altering disability without receiving any assistance to get you back on your feet.

So if you get hurt on the job – protect yourself and your family by filing your claim. And if you’re concerned about the potential repercussions of doing so, consult with legal counsel to make sure you understand not just what problems may arise if you do file your claim, but what problems may arise if you don’t.

Call attorney Charles Schultz, Esq. today at 410-769-5400.

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